Cyberwarfare Magazine

Warfare in the Information Age

Posts Tagged ‘malware

The Palestine-Israeli Conflict on the Web

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As any conflict that happened in the 21st century, there is usually a parallel conflict raging online as well. Either commanded by individuals or groups, which can be helped or not by either government agencies or other interest groups, acts of cyberwarfare are getting more and more common. The conflict in the Gaza strip offers a new opportunity to explore this kind of activity. This time, reports of websites defacement are numerous and ongoing, some reporting that malware is spreaded from hacked websites and even an Israeli botnet is starting to grow in order to attack Hamas supporters servers.

Reports are now growing over hundreds of websites defacements of Western websites by Palestinians supporters1. Various Palestinian groups and supporters have been vandalizing Israeli and other western nation commercial websites by putting propaganda and redirecting to jihadist forums and/or uploading malware on the hacked web servers. Hackers mentioned in the article are Team Evil, DNS Team, Tw!$3r, KaSPeRs HaCKeR CreW, PaLiSeNiaN HaCK, MoRoCcAn HaCkErZ.

Palestinian Propaghanda insert into Defaced Websites

Palestinian Propaganda insert into Defaced Websites

Recently, sites from the U.S Army and NATO have also been targeted by the vandals2. Archived versions of the hacked NATO webpage can be found here and here for the hacked version of the U.S Army website. For now, only defacements have been reported and no real attack has occured. Web defacement is a very easy attack to do on web servers with weak passwords. Most of the time, the attackers are script kiddies using software such as AccessDiver with a list of proxies and wordlists to conduct dictionaries attacks on servers. Using AccessDiver is fairly simple and many tutorials can be found on YouTube. Other ways include of course exploits and SQL injections attacks. Surprisingly, no DDoS attacks have been reported yet, but a group of Israeli students launch the “Help Israel Win” initiative3. At the time of writing, the website was online available through Google’s cache. Anoher website (http://help-israel-win.tk/) has been suspended. The goal was to develop a voluntary botnet dubbed “Patriot” to attack Hamas-related websites:

We have launched a new project that unites the computer capabilities of many computers around the world. Our goal is to use this power in order to disrupt our enemy’s efforts to destroy the state of Israel4.

The website offered a small executable to download. This bot would receive commands as a normal criminal bot would. Hamas-friendly sites like qudsnews.net and palestine-info.info were targeted by the IRC botnet. Still according to the article, the botnet has come under attack by unknown assaillants5. No definitive number is given as to how many machines the botnet is controlling, it might range from anything from 1000 to 8000 machines6. Very few detail is given on how the bot actually works.

There was a very similar attempt to create a “conscript” botnet known as the e-Jihad botnet that failed to realized its objective last year, as the tool was unsophisticated and rather crude7. The e-Jihad tool had the same objective as the Patriot botnet, which was to launch DDoS attacks against various targets.

e-Jihad 3.0 Screen

e-Jihad 3.0 Screen

Nevertheless, this kind of parallel attack is due to become a popular civilian option to attack servers. The only thing needed is to create a solid botnet, by using some of the most sophisticated criminal botnets and transform them into voluntary “cyber-armies”. There is one problem thought…how can we make sure it’s legitimate ? Making such programs open source ? But then you reveal your command and control servers and information that could make the enemy hijack our own botnet. It then all comes down to a question of trust…and of course, a clear and easy way to remove the bot anytime.

See also :

“Army Mil and NATO Paliarment hacked by Turks”, Roberto Preatoni,  Zone-H, http://www.zone-h.org/content/view/15003/30/ (accessed on January 10, 2009)



1“Battle for Gaza Fought on the Web, Too”, Jart Armin, Internet Evolution, January 5, 2009, http://www.internetevolution.com/author.asp?section_id=717&doc_id=169872& (accessed on January 10, 2009)

2“Pro-Palestine vandals deface Army, NATO sites”, Dan Goodin, The Register, January 10, 2009, http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/01/10/army_nato_sites_defaced/ (accessed on January 10, 2009)

3“Wage Cyberwar Against Hamas, Surrender Your PC”, Noah Shachtman, Danger Room, Wired, January 8, 2009, http://blog.wired.com/defense/2009/01/israel-dns-hack.html, (accessed on January 10, 2009)

4Copied from Google’s cache of help-israel-win.org

5Ibid.

6Hacktivist tool targets Hamas”, John Leyden, The Register, January 9, 2008, http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/01/09/gaza_conflict_patriot_cyberwars/ (accessed on January 10, 2009)

7“E-Jihad vs. Storm”, Peter Coogan, Symantec, September 11, 2007, https://forums.symantec.com/t5/blogs/blogarticlepage/blog-id/malicious_code/article-id/170#M170 (accessed on January 10, 2009)

Malware Authors Loves Obama Too

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The Register reports that malware creators are already using Mr. Obama’s popularity to distribute the Papras Trojan using spam, social engineering and Google Ads[1].

Users usually receive an email from what seems a legitimate news sources such as CNN and BBC, inviting users to see the speech of Barack Obama on their website. The content of the email is the following[2]:

Barack Obama Elected 44th President of United States

Barack Obama, unknown to most Americans just four years ago, will become the 44th president and the first African-American president of the United States.
Watch His amazing speech at November 5!

Proceed to the election results news page>>

2008 American Government Official Website
This site delivers information about current U.S. Foreign policy and about American life and culture.

And senders are usually:

  • news@cnn.com
    news@usatoday.com
    news@online.com
    news@c18-ss-1-lb.cnet.com
    news@president.com
    news@unitedstates.com
    news@bbc.com

The email contains a link to a fake website, which prompts the users to update their Flash player in order to see the speech. Of course, the update is actually a Trojan.

Screen shots of the email and fake website, from F-Secure[3]:

 

Papras is an information stealing Trojan, trying to get a hold of logins and passwords among others. This Trojan is detected by only 14 of the 36 major anti-virus programs.


[1] “Obama-themed malware mauls world+dog”, Dan Goodin, The Register, November 5, 2008, http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/11/05/obama_malware_attacks/ (accessed November 6, 2008)

[2] “Computer Virus masquerades as Obama Acceptance Speech Video”, Gary Warner, CyberCrime & Doing Time, November 5, 2008, http://garwarner.blogspot.com/2008/11/computer-virus-masquerades-as-obama.html (accessed on November 6, 2008)

[3] “US Presidential Malware”, F-Secure, November 5, 2008, http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/archives/00001530.html (accessed on November 6, 2008)

Written by Jonathan Racicot

November 6, 2008 at 4:26 pm

Fake Anti-Virus Brings in 158 000$ a Week

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Russian criminals who are selling a fake anti-virus, “Antivirus XP 2008/2009” among others, have made more than 150 000$ in a week, according to the Sydney Morning Herald[1]. If you ever seen those annoying popups warning you that you might be infected with one or more viruses, then you probably came across this scam.

Fake Spyware Detection Alert

Fake Spyware Detection Alert

“For most people they might just be browsing the web and suddenly they don’t know why this thing will pop up in their face, telling them they’ve got 309 infections on their computer, it will change their desktop wallpaper, change their screen saver to fake ‘blue screens of death’,” said Joe Stewart, from SecureWorks said.

The software is sold for 49.95 $US and will “detect” various viruses and Trojans on the computer. Stewart shows that Antivirus XP still has some basic anti-malware functionality, but as he explains, it’s mostly in case the authors are brought to court “they might try to claim the program is not truly fraudulent – after all, it can clean computers of at least a few malicious programs[2]“. Only 17 minor threats can be removed, far from the 102,563 viruses the anti-virus claims to clean. And don’t expect a refund for the software.

The entity behind this fraudware is called Bakasoftware, a Russian company that pays affiliates to sell its anti-virus to users. Affiliates can earn between 58% and 90% of the sale price. Criminals are therefore using everyway to trick users into installing the software, including scaring the user into believing that he is infected, even using botnets to push the program into the users’ computers.

Since it is not hacking people’s computers and only runs the affiliate program, Bakasoftware does not have to worry about being shut down by police“, Stewart said[3].

Affiliate ID

Affiliate Username

Account Balance (USD)

4928 nenastniy $158,568.86
56 krab $105,955.76
2 rstwm $95,021.16
4748 newforis $93,260.64
5016 slyers $85,220.22
3684 ultra $82,174.54
3750 cosma2k $78,824.88
5050 dp322 $75,631.26
3886 iamthevip $61,552.63
4048 dp32 $58,160.20
Table 1.0 – Top earners in the Bakasoftware Affiliate Program[4]
 

Screenshots took from the administrative panel of bakasoftware.com which was hacked by NeoN:

Bakasoftware Registred Domains

Bakasoftware Registred Domains

Bakasoftware All Socks Controls

Bakasoftware All Socks Controls

(Screenshots are from “Rogue Antivirus Dissected – Part 2”, Joe Steward, SecureWorks, October 22, 2008, http://www.secureworks.com/research/threats/rogue-antivirus-part-2/?threat=rogue-antivirus-part-2)

By the time of this writing, http://www.bakasoftware.com/ was not accessible. Another interesting fact, if the Russian language is installed on your computer, there’s a good chance you won’t be considered as a target because of Russian legislation. Apparently the creators have been sued anyway[5].

Many other fraudware are available, always proposing anti-malware software. Their ads are oven seen on torrents, warez and cracks/serials sites. What’s particularly dangerous is that they can come with other legitimate software or by drive-by downloads. Once they are installed in your computer, they get annoying very fast and can trick you into buying fraudware. Popups can appear that you are infected. Other types of fraudware are those “boost your computer” software.

P.S “baka” means “stupid” in Japanese. A totally appropriate title for the operators of this company.
See also:

“Fake software nets hacker $158,000 in a week”, Stewart Meagher, The Inquirer, November 5, 2008, http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/11/05/fake-antivirus-nets-hacker-150 (accessed on November 5, 2008)

“Antiviral ‘Scareware’ Just One More Intruder”, John Markoff, The New York Times, October 29, 2008, http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/30/technology/internet/30virus.html (accessed on November 5, 2008)

“Crooks can make $5M a year shilling fake security software”, Gregg Keizer, ComputerWorld, October 31, 2008, http://computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&taxonomyName=security_hardware_and_software&articleId=9118778&taxonomyId=145&intsrc=kc_top (accessed on November 5, 2008)


[1] “Russian scammers cash in on pop-up menace”, Asher Moses, The Sydney Herald, November 4, 2008, p.1, http://www.smh.com.au/news/technology/security/russian-scammers-cash-in-on-popup-menace/2008/11/04/1225560814202.html (accessed on November 5, 2008)

 

[2] “Rogue Antivirus Dissected – Part 1”, Joe Stewart, SecureWorks, October 21, 2008, http://www.secureworks.com/research/threats/rogue-antivirus-part-1/?threat=rogue-antivirus-part-1 (accessed on November 5, 2008)

[3] “Russian scammers cash in on pop-up menace”, Asher Moses, The Sydney Herald, November 4, 2008, p.2, http://www.smh.com.au/news/technology/security/russian-scammers-cash-in-on-popup-menace/2008/11/04/1225560814202.html (accessed on November 5, 2008)

[4] “Rogue Antivirus Dissected – Part 2”, Joe Steward, SecureWorks, October 22, 2008, http://www.secureworks.com/research/threats/rogue-antivirus-part-2/?threat=rogue-antivirus-part-2 (accessed on November 5, 2008)

[5] “Infamous vendor of “AntiVirus XP” badware sued”, Adam O’Donnell, ZDNet, September 30th, 2008, http://blogs.zdnet.com/security/?p=1980 (accessed on November 5, 2008


Written by Jonathan Racicot

November 5, 2008 at 4:28 pm

Microsoft: Malware Up 38% in United States in 2008

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According to the latest Security Intelligence Report from Microsoft, malicious software installations on computers increased 38% in the U.S for 2008.[1] Also, the number of “High Severity” vulnerabilities detected increased by 13% in the second half of 2007, putting the total of “High Severity” vulnerabilities to 48%.

Downloaders and droppers, accounting for 30% of all malicious software, with around 7 millions computers infected in the United States alone.

And of course, no good Microsoft document would be complete by stating that Vista in more awesome than XP, and therefore the report states that if you own Windows XP SP3, you’re likely to be infected 9 times on 1000 infections, while this number drops to 4 times on 1000 infections for Vista.

“For browser-based attacks on Windows XP-based machines, Microsoft vulnerabilities accounted for 42 percent of the total. On Windows Vista-based machines, however, the proportion of vulnerabilities attacked in Microsoft software was much smaller, accounting for just 6 percent of the total[2].”

Taken from the report:

Country/Region

2007

2008

% Chg.

Afghanistan

58.8

76.4

29.9

Bahrain

28.2

29.2

3.4

Morocco

31.3

27.8

-11.4

Albania

30.7

25.4

-17.4

Mongolia

29.9

24.7

-17.6

Brazil

13.2

23.9

81.8

Iraq

23.8

23.6

-1.1

Dominican Republic

24.5

23.2

-5.2

Egypt

24.3

22.5

-7.5

Saudi Arabia

22.2

22.3

0.4

Tunisia

15.9

21.9

37.3

Turkey

25.9

21.9

-15.4

Jordan

20.4

21.6

5.5

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

16.3

21.1

29.8

Lebanon

20.6

20.2

-1.8

Yemen

17.7

20.1

13.7

Portugal

14.9

19.6

31.7

Algeria

22.2

19.5

-12.2

Libya

17.3

19.5

13.1

Mexico

14.8

17.3

17

United Arab Emirates

18.2

17.3

-4.8

Monaco

13.7

17.0

23.7

Serbia

11.8

16.6

41.4

Bosnia and Herzegovina

12.8

16.3

27.5

Jamaica

15.0

16.3

8.9

Table 1.0 – Countries with the Highest Infection Rates[3]

See also:

“Microsoft Security Intelligence Report”, Microsoft, January-June 2008, http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=B2984562-47A2-48FF-890C-EDBEB8A0764C&displaylang=en (accessed on November 4, 2008)

“Les menaces en augmentation de 43%, dit Microsoft”, Marie-Ève Morasse, Cyberpresse, November 3, 2008, http://technaute.cyberpresse.ca/nouvelles/internet/200811/03/01-35773-les-menaces-en-augmentation-de-43-dit-microsoft.php (in French) (accessed on November 4, 2008)


[1] “Microsoft Security Intelligence Report”, Microsoft, January-June 2008, p. 122

[2] Ibid. p. 5

[3] Ibid. p.49

Written by Jonathan Racicot

November 4, 2008 at 4:39 pm